Tagged: higher education

Recording videos for incoming students and the transition to higher education

As part of an institutional-wide project on the Transition to Higher Education, I presented a few months back on an approach to create videos to help students understand what a subject entails at university-level. One of the biggest challenges that some subjects have is that they are not taught at A Level, which means for the vast majority of their students they are starting from scratch. Simply getting a basic understanding of what the subject is, and more importantly why it is relevant for today’s society (and careers), is a key part of both the recruitment and transition experience.

MOOCs – Enough of the sensationalism, will they really affect Higher Education?

I have avoided writing a post on MOOCs (massive open online courses) for far too long. Partly because many other people have written about them already, and partly because I fear I might just write a diatribe. I’m not against the concept of MOOCs I hasten to add (I’d love to develop one), but against the way that MOOCs are being proclaimed by those who don’t know better as the game-changer of higher education. So, be prepared, this could get messy!

What makes a 21st Century teacher? (Durham Blackboard Conference 2013)

Summary of Panel Discussion: What makes a 21st Century teacher?

Durham Blackboard Users Conference, Durham University, 8-9 January 2013.

Panelists: Ray Land, Richard Pears (Durham University); Jeremy Knox (Edinburgh University); Peter Felton (Elon University, USA); Mike Cameron and Iain Wheeldon (Newcastle University).

Chair: Malcolm Murray

Laws of the Web – Bandwidth

I’ve borrowed a book from the University Library. Published in 2001, Bernado A. Huberman’s ‘The Laws of the Web: Patterns in the Ecology of Information’, offers a window back a decade to when the internet boom started and mass-access in the developed world became a reality. I’m probably the only person to borrow this book in quite some time, but thought it would be a great way to see if commentary on the internet in ‘olden times’ still holds merit to today’s use of the technology – in particular here the context of content creation for students.