Tagged: elearning

MOOCs – Enough of the sensationalism, will they really affect Higher Education?

I have avoided writing a post on MOOCs (massive open online courses) for far too long. Partly because many other people have written about them already, and partly because I fear I might just write a diatribe. I’m not against the concept of MOOCs I hasten to add (I’d love to develop one), but against the way that MOOCs are being proclaimed by those who don’t know better as the game-changer of higher education. So, be prepared, this could get messy!

Four types of student posts in introductory online discussion activities

In introductory or ice-breaker activities, there are four types of posts that are made by students/participants on discussion boards or community blogs. These four types I have drawn up after looking at a selection of ‘Welcome Sites’ for new students. These Welcome Sites are used for new students to make contact with each other and the Department before they arrive at University. In these sites there is a blog in which students are instructed to make a ‘hello’ post which will be replied to by second year student facilitators or staff.

What makes a 21st Century teacher? (Durham Blackboard Conference 2013)

Summary of Panel Discussion: What makes a 21st Century teacher?

Durham Blackboard Users Conference, Durham University, 8-9 January 2013.

Panelists: Ray Land, Richard Pears (Durham University); Jeremy Knox (Edinburgh University); Peter Felton (Elon University, USA); Mike Cameron and Iain Wheeldon (Newcastle University).

Chair: Malcolm Murray

Laws of the Web – Bandwidth

I’ve borrowed a book from the University Library. Published in 2001, Bernado A. Huberman’s ‘The Laws of the Web: Patterns in the Ecology of Information’, offers a window back a decade to when the internet boom started and mass-access in the developed world became a reality. I’m probably the only person to borrow this book in quite some time, but thought it would be a great way to see if commentary on the internet in ‘olden times’ still holds merit to today’s use of the technology – in particular here the context of content creation for students.

Reflections: Online resource personalisation; Work based learning (ALT-C 2011)

This is the second of a series of blog posts covering my reaction to the ALT-C 2011 conference sessions.

Effectiveness of technology to support work based learning: the stakeholders’ perspective 

Rebecca Strachan, Lalith Liyanage, Biddy Casselden, Roger Penlington

Northumbria University