Book recommendations: recommended reading – elearning, web usability and development

There are many books out there on elearning, higher education teaching, web usability, accessibility (and all the other things I’m interested in). Though the list below is by no means comprehensive, it will provide you with a good starting point for your office library.

Google Docs with tablets and BYOD for seminar tasks

Use of Google Docs in class as collaborative documents and method for feedback

My recent investigations into tablet and laptop ownership amongst our students have suggested that we might be able to take advantage of these devices in-class. Dr Antonios Roumpakis, one of our lecturers in Social Policy, proposed where this might be useful.

Recording videos for incoming students and the transition to higher education

As part of an institutional-wide project on the Transition to Higher Education, I presented a few months back on an approach to create videos to help students understand what a subject entails at university-level. One of the biggest challenges that some subjects have is that they are not taught at A Level, which means for the vast majority of their students they are starting from scratch. Simply getting a basic understanding of what the subject is, and more importantly why it is relevant for today’s society (and careers), is a key part of both the recruitment and transition experience.

Copyright training with clickers – evaluation

As part of the Social Media for Social Policy short course I run for students at the University of York, one of the key introductory sessions is on copyright. This session aims to inform students about digital copyright and ensure they do not infringe copyright using third-party works when creating their social media projects.

Coloured photographic lens filter test for digital cameras

If you’ve ever wondered what the effect of coloured filters has on photos taken by digital cameras, well wonder no more. I recently purchased a cheap set of colour solid and graduated filters and decided it was time to run a little experiment. See the results here:

Four types of student posts in introductory online discussion activities

In introductory or ice-breaker activities, there are four types of posts that are made by students/participants on discussion boards or community blogs. These four types I have drawn up after looking at a selection of ‘Welcome Sites’ for new students. These Welcome Sites are used for new students to make contact with each other and the Department before they arrive at University. In these sites there is a blog in which students are instructed to make a ‘hello’ post which will be replied to by second year student facilitators or staff.

Planning a resource-based learning website for students

Video

This video is a presentation of how a Social Work Service User Participation website was planned. The site aim is to enable service users and students to interact and to provide a repository of information for students. It was developed by Pat Walton and Sue Lansley of the Department of Social Policy and Social Work at the University of York with my advice in planning for the student learning experience.